Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The Theatre
#21
You mean Turn off the Dark? It made it onto Broadway, but I think its run ended sometime last year.

Let us all take a moment to remember those wounded in its undertaking.
Life is like a roller coaster.  It has its ups and downs, but if you sit back and relax you get one heck of a ride.

NationStates: The Associated Systems of Klonor

Equality is not a loss.
Quote
#22
Yea. I only remember because Gail had a funny joke that was told before the more serious injuries. One guy actually had his leg amputated.
Quote
#23
I hadn't heard that they were that extreme, all I'd heard were broken bones, which is serious-but-not-too-serious-that-you-can't-laugh-at-it.
Life is like a roller coaster.  It has its ups and downs, but if you sit back and relax you get one heck of a ride.

NationStates: The Associated Systems of Klonor

Equality is not a loss.
Quote
#24
Lester, if you want to laugh at a superhero musical, try this one.

70's Superman, the musical.



Always be true to yourself.

Being transgender is beautiful.
Quote
#25
There were also serious head injuries. You had actresses', do you call them that or is everyone an actor, anyway you had women getting pulled up way too high and their heads hitting cealing equipment. Eventually they figured it out, the stories of people getting hurt stopped, but it was bad there for a while.

(03-31-2015, 07:24 PM)Lady_Hawkeye Wrote:  Lester, if you want to laugh at a superhero musical, try this one.

70's Superman, the musical.




Adam West, Lynda Carter and Burt Ward have a LOT to answer for here. Angry
Quote
#26
I'll say this about the stereotypical goons in there, they have a whole lot of guts if they are willing to go into hand to hand combat with freaking Superman.

Then again, in this version, Superman has the physical shape of Bruce Banner Smile
Always be true to yourself.

Being transgender is beautiful.
Quote
#27
Hey, singing metahumans are no laughing matter. Music Meister almost took over the world once, you know.
Quote
#28
Don't worry, we've got The Bat in our corner to help out:



Life is like a roller coaster.  It has its ups and downs, but if you sit back and relax you get one heck of a ride.

NationStates: The Associated Systems of Klonor

Equality is not a loss.
Quote
#29
Heck, I just found the entire Super Friends musical (With a stuck in DC universe Spidey for some reason....)





That............hmmm.............that actually left me speechless. Smile
Always be true to yourself.

Being transgender is beautiful.
Quote
#30
[quote='JBK405' pid='6727' dateline='1427842707']
Don't worry, we've got The Bat in our corner to help out:



[quote='JBK405' pid='6727' dateline='1427842707']
Don't worry, we've got The Bat in our corner to help out:





Quote
#31
I saw Fish In the Dark earlier today with family and...eh, it was okay. It's written by and starring Larry David, the writer/producer behind Seinfeld and Curb Your Enthusiasm, and the roots are very obvious; it often felt just like watching an episode of one of those shows, but even more exaggerated.

If you've got tickets you won't hate it, but I'm not raring to see it again.
Life is like a roller coaster.  It has its ups and downs, but if you sit back and relax you get one heck of a ride.

NationStates: The Associated Systems of Klonor

Equality is not a loss.
Quote
#32
(03-28-2015, 03:08 PM)JBK405 Wrote:  I saw Fun Home last night, and whoa.

Despite being the first night of Previews, which can sometimes come across as essentially a dress-rehearsal since they're still working out kinks and finalizing before opening, it was a full production without noticeable errors or work-in-progress.

The Circle in the Square Theatre was a very interesting venue; seating goes right up to the stage all around its sides, and in the front row I was essentially on the stage (They even came around before the start and told us not to stand up during the show, as we would literally walk into the actors).  Great staging and mechanics; there were plenty of drop-aways and elevated platforms that would lower and raise up through the floor.

The story is, of course, heartbreaking, as Alison struggles with her own sexuality and dealing with her family, who have their own issues that collide and merge with hers.  The choreography and music was wonderful, and I was actually very impressed by the child actors.  Normally kids are the weak spot in any kind of production (Because they're kids), or they get people way too old dressed down, but they were actually children and they kept up with the singing and dancing no problem.

After I saw the show I went to a surprise birthday party for my sister's boyfriend, and surprisingly two people there had actually heard of the original graphic novel, which I didn't expect at all.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0regMbj674

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMJvLTZOhpE

Fun Home just won the Tony Award for Best Musical.
Life is like a roller coaster.  It has its ups and downs, but if you sit back and relax you get one heck of a ride.

NationStates: The Associated Systems of Klonor

Equality is not a loss.
Quote
#33
Aw crap, I always forget about the Tony awards. Work has my brain a bit fried.
Quote
#34
I didn't forget, I never knew they were on at all until my mother texted me and said Fun Home would be featured. She's been meaning to see it herself since I told her about.
Life is like a roller coaster.  It has its ups and downs, but if you sit back and relax you get one heck of a ride.

NationStates: The Associated Systems of Klonor

Equality is not a loss.
Quote
#35
I recently started watching this on Netflix:
[Image: o7LnRxO.jpg]

This is actually my first time seeing Phantom, and it's been interesting so far. I won't lie, the opening organ music that played while the title credits rolled was awesome. Big Grin
Quote
#36
Interesting conundrum while watching the awards; I wanted Fun Home to win, but I couldn't honestly say whether or not it deserved to win as I hadn't seen any of the other nominees. How could I say definitively that Fun Home was the superior production?

I suppose this is like rooting for your sports team; what makes them any better than any other sports team?
Life is like a roller coaster.  It has its ups and downs, but if you sit back and relax you get one heck of a ride.

NationStates: The Associated Systems of Klonor

Equality is not a loss.
Quote
#37
I saw my young cousin perform in New York today! Wow!

Okay, so it was an end-of-training performance by her theatre class and not as if she was on Broadway, but it's still amazing that she's singing and dancing on a cabaret stage in New York City. I took four hours out of work today to catch a train into the city, although my fifteen-block sprint back to the station afterwards nearly gave a me a stroke in our heat.

The cost of admission was actually ridiculous, the venue had a $16 cover charge plus a two-drink minimum at $6 each, so it was essentially a $28.00 cover charge, but I was glad to pay to get to see her perform. The ages of the performers ranged from less-than-10 to the late-teens, and some of the performances were really good (Others were, of course, 'good for a kid'). It was primarily a sequence of vignettes, individuals or groups singings unconnected songs, but there were a few small skits as well, plus one large Wizard of Oz sequence.

My cousin was in one of the bits that had a small acting component. It opened with her upset at two other girls who had apparently come to her rescue while being bullied, since traditionally her character was the one who protected them and she felt that they wouldn't have a need for her as a friend anymore if they could stand up for themselves. They then all sang a song about friendship. I'll be honest, I was tearing up a bit, partly because even as acting it hurts to see my little cousin dealing with being bullied, and also at all of the self-worth issues that can be conveyed in only two minutes of dialogue.

The Wizard of Oz sequence was really interesting, as they sang songs from the 1939 film, Wicked and also The Wiz.

We need to get more kids into theatre.
Life is like a roller coaster.  It has its ups and downs, but if you sit back and relax you get one heck of a ride.

NationStates: The Associated Systems of Klonor

Equality is not a loss.
Quote
#38
I saw the new musical play The Bandstand this weekend with my grandmother.  Set in the immediate aftermath of World War II, its main character comes home from the war and attempts to put a band together composed solely of veterans to compete in a nationwide music competition.  That plot sounds like one of the most cliched things you've ever heard except the play focuses really hard on the fact that each one of these veterans is traumatized pretty severely by what they experienced, and their playing music is a way to cope with it...and it doesn't work.  The very first song of the play is about how soon things will be back like they were before, but everything after that is about how things can't go back to what they were like before.

There's this fantastic scene where each of the characters is being closely followed by other people mimicking their motions, and it's a representation of them literally being followed by what happened.  Each character has their own way of trying to deal with with the legacy; one of them is on medication for his injuries and when he takes a pill, the other person takes a step back...but he doesn't go away.  Another one drinks heavily, and when he takes a sip the person behind him takes a step back...but doesn't go away.  It's not until the end of the scene, when they're all playing together, that the followers walk off the stage at the end of the scene.

The final song of the play, "Welcome Home" (performed during the contest), was amazingly powerful and I began to get a little moist.  Most of the other competitors sang happy songs glorifying the war or talking about abstracts concepts, but their song talked about just what they brought back from the war.  How they're 'home', but still not back.

Another fantastic part of the play, albeit pretty down, was how none of them managed to get completely better.  Not a one.  The one who drinks to black out the memory is still drinking at the end; the one who was kicked out by his wife because he attempted to regiment their entire life like they were in boot camp still hasn't been welcomed back; the one on medication still needs his medication.  These problems don't go away just because of a single happy moment, you don't join a band and suddenly forget all your problems, it's an ongoing process that takes a thousand tiny steps, and maybe you never will reach the end, but what matters is that you keep working towards it.

Unfortunately, the play as a construct wasn't perfect and the execution could have used some work.  A lot of plotlines were brought up and then dropped abruptly; there's one scene where the main character/band leader tells one of the players to stop hogging the attention while performing and it seems to be laying the groundwork for either a contest over creative control or publicity, but it never comes up again afterwards.  They have a problem at one gig and are shorted on the money, but it turns out they're waaaaay short of their money goal anyway, so losing or gaining this money didn't effect things either way.  Some of the personal problems aren't addressed at the climax, and though I do like that they weren't magically solved, I don't like how they're not even addressed (For example, the guy who was kicked out because he tried to treat home like the military, is he at least talking to his wife?  Does he get to see his kids?  Are they working towards a reconciliation?  Is he able to relax a bit now, or is he as bad as ever?). If the play ever makes it to Broadway I hope that they'll do some reworking and editing to smooth it out.
Life is like a roller coaster.  It has its ups and downs, but if you sit back and relax you get one heck of a ride.

NationStates: The Associated Systems of Klonor

Equality is not a loss.
Quote
#39
[Image: hp15_q4_square_ls_pottermore.jpg]

Remember that Harry Potter play I mentioned a long while ago? Well, it's now the official eighth entry in the Harry Potter series and will be a two-parter.

The synopsis, via Pottermore:

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places.
Quote
#40
Speaking of Potter, I actually just a few days ago came across this interesting fan theory that Harry is of Indian descent on his father's side. "Potter" is apparently a reasonable Anglicization of several different Indian surnames, descriptions of what the Potters were doing the night Voldermort killed them lines up with the celebration of a holiday that would have been happening at that time, the schism between the Potters and the Dursleys and their mistreatment of Harry makes more sense if they're bigoted against an interracial couples, etc.

I'd never heard this theory before, and I haven't done much research to see if the 'facts' line up, but it's a very interesting theory and would turn the hero of one of the biggest fantasy franchises in history into a person of color. Whoa.
Life is like a roller coaster.  It has its ups and downs, but if you sit back and relax you get one heck of a ride.

NationStates: The Associated Systems of Klonor

Equality is not a loss.
Quote


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)